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Thursday, February 6, 2020 | History

3 edition of S.R. Ranganathan, an intellectual biography found in the catalog.

S.R. Ranganathan, an intellectual biography

Girja Kumar

S.R. Ranganathan, an intellectual biography

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Published by Har-Anand Publications in New Delhi .
Written in English

    Places:
  • India
    • Subjects:
    • Ranganathan, S. R. 1892-1972.,
    • Librarians -- India -- Biography.

    • About the Edition

      Biography of Shiyali Ramamrita Ranganathan, 1892-1972, librarian from India.

      Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references and index.

      StatementGirja Kumar.
      GenreBiography.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsZ720.R35 G57 1992
      The Physical Object
      Pagination327 p. ;
      Number of Pages327
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1378290M
      ISBN 108124100055
      LC Control Number92910492

      During that time, he helped to found the Madras Library Association, and lobbied actively for the establishment of free public libraries throughout India and for the creation of a comprehensive national library. In addition to the almost uncountable number of books and articles Ranganathan authored, he also created several professional and educational organizations, primarily in India, and he participated in library movements around the world. Ranganathan Ask anyone pursuing a degree in librarianship to name the most influential person in library science, and most will quickly respond with Melvil Dewey, creator of the Dewey Decimal System. The library is a growing organism. It was a vocation he thoroughly enjoyed, and he spent much of his leisure time cultivating public awareness of the importance of math and the sciences through a series of well-attended lectures. Ranganathan's autobiography, published serially during his life, is titled A Librarian Looks Back.

      His lifelong goal was to teach mathematics, and he was successively a member of the mathematics faculties at universities in MangaloreCoimbatore and Madras. He is an independent Industrial Consultant and lives in Luxembourg. In the university offered him the position of librarian. Ranganathan refocused the attention of the field to access-related issues, such as the library's location, loan policies, hours and days of operation, as well as the quality of staffing and mundane matters like library furniture, temperature control and lighting.

      Ranganathan, as "making an Ulster of the R Ranganathan Book 30 editions published between and in English and Undetermined and held by WorldCat member libraries worldwide The five laws of library science by S. Although there is no evidence that Ranganathan did any of this for political reasons, his changes to the library had the result of educating more people, making information available to all, and even aiding women and minorities in the information-seeking process. He anecdotally proved this with the Dewey Decimal Classification DDC by taking several books and showing how each might be classified with two totally different resultant DDC numbers. While in Zurich, though, he endowed a professorship at Madras University in honour of his wife of thirty years, largely as an ironic gesture in retaliation for the persecution he suffered for many years at the hands of that university's administration. The Five Laws of Library Science are some of the most influential concepts in the field.


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S.R. Ranganathan, an intellectual biography book

A deal was struck that Ranganathan would travel to London to study contemporary Western practices in librarianship, and that, if he returned and still rejected librarianship as a career, the mathematics lectureship would be his again. In he returned to India a different person. Use technology intelligently to enhance service.

He returned to and held the position of University Librarian at the University of Madras for twenty years. His career as an educator was somewhat hindered by stammering a difficulty he gradually overcame in his professional life.

Protect free access to knowledge. For most librarians today, he is primarily remembered for two contributions: the Five Laws of Library Science and the Colon Classification. To a mind such as Ranganathan's, a structured, step-by-step system acknowledging each facet of the topic of the work was immensely preferable to the anarchy and "intellectual laziness" as he termed it of the DDC.

At University College, he earned marks only slightly above average, but his mathematical mind latched onto the problem of classification, a subject typically taught by rote in library programs of the time. On 27 Septemberhe died of complications from bronchitis. Overview[ edit ] First Law: Books are for use[ edit ] The first law constitutes the basis for the library services.

Since they were published inthese five laws "have remained a centerpiece of professional values In library science and LIS education, we need to stop omitting so much — in order to become a global and modern profession.

These laws are: Books are for use, Every reader his or her book, Every book its reader, Save the time of the reader, and The library is a growing organism. He was born in Madras, India, intrained as a mathematician, and eventually became a lecturer of mathematics at the University of Madras.

He also drafted plans for a national and several state library systems, founded and edited several journals, and was active in numerous professional associations. Every web resource its user. Every book its reader.

During that time, he helped to found the Madras Library Association, and lobbied actively for the establishment of free public libraries throughout India and for the creation of a comprehensive national library. He invented tools to store information.

Ranganathan was considered by many to be a workaholic. Ranganathan began his professional life as a mathematician; he earned B.

S R Ranganathan

During that time, he helped to found the Madras Library Association, and lobbied actively for the establishment of free public libraries throughout India and for the creation of a comprehensive national library.

Ranganathan briefly moved to ZurichSwitzerlandfrom towhen his son married a European girl; the unorthodox relationship did not sit well with Ranganathan, although his time in Zurich allowed him to expand his contacts within the European library community, where he gained a significant following.

While in Zurich, though, he endowed a professorship at Madras University in honour of his wife of thirty years, largely as an ironic gesture in retaliation for the persecution he suffered for many years at the hands of that university's administration. Ranganathan used this methodology for classification, management, reference, administration, and many other subjects.

We need to plan and build with the expectation that our sites and our users will grow and change over time. One of his most powerful insights at this time was what was later referred to as the Acknowledgment of Duplication, which states that any system of classification of information necessarily implies at least two different classifications for any given datum.

The Library is a growing organism.

Five Laws of Library Science

They are: Books are for use. South America and its book history might as well not exist. To his own surprise, he received the appointment and accepted the position in January Save the time of the reader. He began drafting the system that was ultimately to become colon classification while in England, and refined it as he returned home, even going so far as to reorder the ship's library on the voyage back to India.Home › Library development › For All Librarians › Administration › Five Laws of Library Science Five Laws of Library Science.

Laws - S.R. Ranganathan, Books are for use; Every reader his book; Every book its reader; Save the time of the reader. A Closer Look at the Work of S.R. Ranganathan. Ask anyone pursuing a degree in librarianship to name the most influential person in library science, and most will quickly respond with Melvil Dewey, creator of the Dewey Decimal System.

A strong case can be made, however, for Shiyali Ranganathan, whose pioneering work served as the foundation for the modern role of libraries as public centers. Get print book. No eBook available. S.R. Ranganathan, an Intellectual Biography. Girja Kumar.

Har-Anand Publications, - Librarians - pages. 0 Reviews. Biography of Shiyali Ramamrita Ranganathan,librarian from India. From inside the book. What people are saying - Write a review.

We haven't found any reviews in the usual. S. R. Ranganathan, also known as the Father of Indian Librarianship, contributed more than 60 books and over 1, articles.

He wrote on library management, book selection, reference service, library buildings and furniture, and the “chain procedure to deriving subject index entries” (Gopinath,p), among other topics. Aug 18,  · Discover Book Depository's huge selection of S R Ranganathan books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles.

Shiyali Ramamrita Ranganathan (S.R.R.) (listen (help · info) 12 August – 27 September ) was a mathematician and librarian from India. His most notable contributions to the field were his five laws of library science and the development of the first major faceted classification system, the colon atlasbowling.com is considered to be the father of library science, documentation, and Died: 27 September (aged 80), Bangalore, India.